Sean Connery

Filmography Sean Connery

Date of birth: 25/08/30 (89 years)
Family name: Thomas Sean Connery
 Nationality: United Kingdom

Sir Thomas Sean Connery is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, and BAFTA Award-winning Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. In 1988 he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role in The Untouchables. Sir Sean Connery was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in July 2000. 
 
Connery is known for retaining his Scottish accent in films, regardless of the nationality of the character played. Despite being older than most contemporary sex symbols, he has repeatedly been name Read his whole biography ed as one of the most attractive men alive by various magazines due to his rugged good looks and his height. 
 
Early life 
Connery was born in Fountainbridge, Edinburgh,  
His first job was as a milkman in Edinburgh with St. Cuthbert's Co-operative Society.He then joined the Royal Navy, but was later discharged on medical grounds because of a duodenal ulcer. Afterwards, he returned to the co-op, then worked at other jobs, including a lorry driver, a labourer and an artist's model for the Edinburgh College of Art,coffin polisher and bodybuilder. 
 
According to Connery's official website, he placed third in the 1950 Mr. Universe bodybuilding contest. Fellow competitor, Johnny Isaacs, suggested him an audition for a stage production of South Pacific. This led Connery to stage, television, and film work. A prominent television role was in Rudolph Cartier's 1961 production of Anna Karenina for BBC Television, in which he co-starred with Claire Bloom. He also acted in Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1956) starring Albert Sharpe. 
 
His first American television role was as a porter in an episode of The Jack Benny Show. 
 
 
Connery's breakthrough came in the role of secret agent James Bond. He acted in seven Bond films, six produced by EON, followed by an unofficial Warner Brothers Thunderball-remake:[9] These include Dr. No (1962), From Russia with Love (1963), Goldfinger (1964), Thunderball (1965), You Only Live Twice (1967), Diamonds Are Forever (1971) and Never Say Never Again (1983) (unofficial). 
 
Connery's portrayal of Bond owes much to stylistic tutelage from director Terence Young, polishing the actor while using his physical grace and presence for the action.  
 
In June 1967, after filming You Only Live Twice, Connery quit the role, having become tired of repetitive plots, a lack of character development, the public's demands of him, and fear of being typecast. He also disliked the fantastic direction in which the series was headed, away from the source material.  
 
The re-make was revived in the 1980s, and Connery was to play Bond for the seventh, and final, time in the "unofficial" film Never Say Never Again; its title is said to derive from Connery's comment after filming Diamonds Are Forever that he'd never again play Bond. Yet, in 2005, Connery again reprised the role with his voice and physical likeness in the video game adaptation of From Russia with Love. 
 
More than forty years after playing the role, Connery's incarnation remains as the definitive cinema James Bond, despite popular interpretations by Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton (often considered akin to the literary Bond), Pierce Brosnan, and Daniel Craig. Connery's feelings about James Bond range from resentment to fondness, once saying he hated the character so much that he'd have killed him, but also saying he never hated Bond, but merely wanted to portray other characters. Certainly, when the James Bond series was at its peak in the mid-1960s, his association with James Bond 007 was so great that his performances in films, such as Alfred Hitchcock's Marnie, A Fine Madness, and Sidney Lumet's The Hill, were ignored.  
 
Although Bond was his most famous role, Connery has also maintained a successful career since. As part of the agreement to appear in Diamonds are Forever, Connery was given carte blanche to produce two films for United Artists, but felt that the only film made under this deal, The Offence, was buried by the studio. Apart from The Man Who Would Be King, most of Connery's successes in the next decade were as part of ensemble casts in films such as Murder on the Orient Express and A Bridge Too Far (in which he acted in a scene opposite Sir Laurence Olivier). His portrayal of Berber chieftain Mulai Ahmed er Raisuli in John Milius's The Wind and the Lion (1975) gained him considerable acclaim from critics and audiences and showed his range as an actor. 
 
In 1981, Sean Connery appeared in the film Time Bandits as Agamemnon.  
 
Following the successful European production The Name of the Rose (1986), for which he won a BAFTA award, Connery's interest in more credible material was revived. That same year, a supporting role in Highlander showcased his ability to play older mentors to younger leads, which would become a recurring role in many of his later films. The following year, his acclaimed performance as a hard-nosed cop in The Untouchables (1987) earned him an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor.  
 
Subsequent box-office hits such as Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) (in which he played Dr. Henry Jones, the father of Harrison Ford, actually only 12 years his junior), The Hunt for Red October (1990) (where he was reportedly called in at two weeks notice),The Russia House (1990), The Rock (1996), and Entrapment (1999) re-established him as an actor capable of playing major parts. Both Last Crusade and The Rock alluded to his James Bond days.  
In more recent years, Connery's filmography has included several box office and critical disappointments such as The Avengers (1998), The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003) and First Knight (1995), but he also received positive reviews for films including Finding Forrester (2000). He also later received a Crystal Globe for outstanding artistic contribution to world cinema. He has often been criticised for never losing his accent, even when playing Russian and Irish characters, but he has said this is out of respect for his country. 
 
 
About a month before his 75th birthday, over the weekend of July 30/31, 2005, it was reported that he had decided to retire from film making following disillusionment with the "idiots now in Hollywood", and the turmoil making (and subsequent box office failure of) the 2003 film The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. 
 
Connery was married to the Australian-born actress Diane Cilento from 1962 to 1973 (he was her second husband). They have one son, Jason Connery (born January 11, 1963) who was educated at Millfield School in Somerset, England and the rigorous Gordonstoun boarding school in Scotland, before going on to become an actor. According to Jason, his parents' divorce was an extremely bitter and painful affair. Diane Cilento wrote an autobiography that paints an unflattering portrait of her ex-husband (see Accusations of abuse paragraph below). 
 
In 1975, Sean Connery married French artist Micheline Roquebrune who is the grandmother of French television journalist Stéphanie Renouvin. 
 
He has a grandson Dashiell Quinn Connery (born in June, 1997) from his son Jason's marriage to actress Mia Sara. 
 
 
 
Sean Connery has long supported the Scottish National Party, a left-of-centre political party campaigning for Scottish independence, both financially and through personal appearances. His involvement in Scottish politics has attracted considerable criticism since he has not resided in Scotland for more than fifty years, being labelled a "tax exile" amongst other things. 
 
Connery received the Légion d'honneur in 1991. He received Kennedy Center Honors from the United States in 1999, presented to him by President Bill Clinton. He received a knighthood as a Knight Bachelor on July 5, 2000, wearing a hunting tartan kilt of the MacLean of Duart clan. He also received the Orden de Manuel Amador Guerrero from Mireya Moscoso, former president of Panama on 11 March 2003, for his talent and versatility as an actor. 
 
In 1993, news that Connery was undergoing radiation treatment for an undisclosed throat ailment sparked media reports that the actor was suffering from throat cancer following years of heavy smoking, and he was falsely declared dead by the Japanese and South African news agencies. Connery immediately appeared on the David Letterman show to deny all of this. In a February 1995 interview with Entertainment Weekly, he said that the radiation treatment was to remove nodules from his vocal cords. His father, a heavy smoker, died from throat cancer in 1972. In 2003, he had surgery to remove cataracts from both eyes. On March 12, 2006, he announced he was recovering from surgery to remove a kidney tumour in January

Filmography Sean Connery